Lynn Hershman – Synthia

Lynn Hershman - Synthia

Synthia is a virtual character who represents fluctuations in the stock market online. Her behavior is triggered by the most recent information on stock prices from NASDAQ, Dow Jones and Russel 2000, and her mood depends on the atmosphere at the stock exchange. If prices go up, Synthia dances about; if they drop, she sits anxiously at her desk.Synthia will be displayed on a plasma screen under a bell glass of an electronic ticker tape inspired by Thomas Edison’s design. Edison made a significant improvement to the electric exchange-rate telegraph by printing Wall Street’s quotations on a paper tape in a legible format. Synthia takes it all a step further by personifying the market as an online set of economic patterns. She is a symbol of the symbiotic relationship between the market and people.

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02.09.08

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Alex Galloway and Radical Software Group – Carnivore

CarnivoreCarnivore is a surveillance tool for data networks, developed by Radical Software Group. At the heart of the project is CarnivorePE, a software application that listens to all Internet traffic (email, web surfing, etc.) on a specific local network. Next, CarnivorePE serves this data stream to interfaces called “clients.” These clients are designed to animate, diagnose, or interpret the network traffic in various ways. Use CarnivorePE to run Carnivore clients from your own desktop, or use it to make your own clients.

Link


02.09.08

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John Klima – Earth

John Klima - Earth
EARTH, a unique geo-spatial visualization system, culls real-time data from the Internet and accurately positions it onto a three-dimensional model of the Earth.

The EARTH software accurately positions real-time data culled from the Internet on a three-dimensional model of the Earth. Viewers are able to travel from layer to layer by zooming in and retrieving imagery and data for specific regions. From the outer to the inner layer, viewers encounter:

  • a detailed, three-dimensional outline of the earth’s coasts, based on United States Geological Survey data.
  • a spherical mapping of GOES-10 weather satellite imagery.
  • LANDSAT-7 satellite imagery of the earth’s surface.
  • topographical maps created from digital elevation data provided by the military mapping agency.
  • a local view of the earth’s terrain (the terrain geometry and textures are generated dynamically from raw data files available from a US military Web site). Here, viewers can “fly” through a five-degree by five-degree patch of the earth’s terrain.
  • the current local weather conditions on the terrain patch — a visual interpretation of weather from more than 6000 weather reporting stations world-wide. Weather stations are identified by a red line and their location. Visibility is translated into density of fog, while temperature influences the color of the fog (blue=cold; red=warm).
  • Link


    02.09.08

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    Golan Levin with Martin Wattenberg, Jonathan Feinberg, Shelly Wynecoop, David Elashoff, and David Becker – The Secret Life of Numbers

    Golan Levin with Martin Wattenberg, Jonathan Feinberg, Shelly Wynecoop, David Elashoff, and David Becker - The Secret Life of Numbers“The authors conducted an exhaustive empirical study, with the aid of custom software, public search engines and powerful statistical techniques, in order to determine the relative popularity of every integer between 0 and one million. The resulting information exhibits an extraordinary variety of patterns which reflect and refract our culture, our minds, and our bodies.

    For example, certain numbers, such as 212, 486, 911, 1040, 1492, 1776, 68040, or 90210, occur more frequently than their neighbors because they are used to denominate the phone numbers, tax forms, computer chips, famous dates, or television programs that figure prominently in our culture. Regular periodicities in the data, located at multiples and powers of ten, mirror our cognitive preference for round numbers in our biologically-driven base-10 numbering system. Certain numbers, such as 12345 or 8888, appear to be more popular simply because they are easier to remember.

    Humanity’s fascination with numbers is ancient and complex. Our present relationship with numbers reveals both a highly developed tool and a highly developed user, working together to measure, create, and predict both ourselves and the world around us. But like every symbiotic couple, the tool we would like to believe is separate from us (and thus objective) is actually an intricate reflection of our thoughts, interests, and capabilities. One intriguing result of this symbiosis is that the numeric system we use to describe patterns, is actually used in a patterned fashion to describe.

    We surmise that our dataset is a numeric snaphot of the collective consciousness. Herein we return our analyses to the public in the form of an interactive visualization, whose aim is to provoke awareness of one’s own numeric manifestations.”

    Link


    02.09.08

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    Grahame Weinbren – Frames

    Grahame Weinbren - FramesGrahame Weinbren’s Frames is an interactive, three-screen projection work, using infra-red sensor arrays to detect user input, combined with randomly accessible video under computer control. It was commissioned by the NTT InterCommunications Center, a media museum in Tokyo, for its 1999 Biennial Exhibition. Frames uses Hugh Diamond’s photographs — the first photographs taken in a mental institution — as a starting point for an examination of the relationship of photographer to subject in the representation of mental disorder. By pointing through hanging gilded frames at projected video images, a viewer gradually transforms young actors into 19th century madwomen. Frames suggests a bridge from the most recent technologies to the breakthrough technology of 150 years ago: black and white portrait photography.

    Link


    02.09.08

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    Gary Hill – Why Do Things Get in a Muddle? (Come on Petunia)

    Gary Hill - Why Do Things Get in a Muddle?  (Come on Petunia)In Why Do Things Get in a Muddle?, Hill’s empirical inquiry into Gregory Bateson’s concept of metalogue — “a conversation about problems between people [that] mirrors the problems themselves” — employs a brilliant methodology to explore relationships between the direction of time and the order of things. A conversation between Alice in Wonderland and her father about “muddles” is constructed through the elaborate technique of reversing the characters’ lines, which were originally performed backwards — a double reversal that suspends meaning in an oddly disembodied objectiveness. Mirrored by precise choreography and camera movement, this astounding presentation of a child’s parable about subjective perception and its semantic paradoxes demonstrates how order is caused by — rather than causes — the interlocking linearity of language, narrative and history.

    Link


    02.09.08

    Uncategorized